Author: DCS Staff

What genre of novel should you write?

Step 1 of 7 14% Do you dream of creating the next Katniss, Sherlock, or Weasley brothers? Take our quiz to find out which genre is your best fit! What is the setting of your novel?*A deserted tropical islandA Victorian mansion in the English countrysideFrance, during World War IIA small town in middle AmericaAn Earth-like planet in a parallel universe What is your favorite character cliché?*Star-crossed loversA guilty butlerA protagonist with a personal struggleA smart, but misfit teenagerVampires. No, werewolves. No, vampires! What's the conflict?*Long-standing family feudMURDERA struggle with personal demonsThe ups and downs of a first loveIntergalactic war...

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800+ learn what works, what doesn’t in distance education

Three national experts are keynotes at the 30th Annual Conference on Distance Teaching & Learning, offered by University of Wisconsin-Madison Continuing Studies Aug. 12-14 at the Monona Terrace Convention Center, to be attended by about 800 educators and trainers from the U.S. and other countries. More than 100 sessions will be led by leaders in the field and real world practitioners from organizations and institutions including Harvard University, University of Michigan Ann Arbor, The Ohio State University, Penn State, University of Massachusetts Amherst, and University of Minnesota. Keynote speaker, Ray Schroeder, associate vice chancellor for online learning at University of Illinois-Springfield, will discuss how to identify online innovations and dead-ends as educators plan for the future. Schroeder notes, “As someone who has worked in distance education for the last 30 years, I can say that more changes have occurred in the last three years than in all the other years.” Another keynote is Michael Quinn Patton, an internationally acclaimed author and evaluation expert, will describe how evaluation can advance innovation in online learning.   Jane Bozarth, author and elearning coordinator of North Carolina Office of State Personnel, will explain how to leverage social media to promote student engagement and learning. A special virtual session will feature the provocative and entertaining futurist in learning and technology, Elliott Masie, speaking about “eLearning moving past and forward.” Masie heads The MASIE Center, a New York...

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Hear Italian ‘Greatest Hits’ for 1200-1600 at Madison Early Music Festival in July

Madison Early Music Festival presents Italia Mia!–a musical journey to Italy, covering the years 1300 to 1600—during the week of July 12–19, with public concerts and lectures on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus or at nearby venues. The Early Music Festival is a UW-Madison Continuing Studies program, presented in partnership with UW-Madison’s School of Music.  The festival’s program director is Prof. Chelcy Bowles, Continuing Studies. The public seven-concert series features sacred and secular music performed by four guest ensembles: The Toronto Consort, Saturday, July 12, Luther Memorial Church; LIBER, Sunday, July 13, Luther Memorial Church; Ex Umbris, Tuesday, July 15, Music Hall, and Trefoil, Friday, July 18, Music Hall. The series also includes: the second annual Handel Aria Competition, Thursday, July 17 in Music Hall; a MEMF Participant Concert, Friday, July 18, Morphy Recital Hall, Humanities Building, and the final All-Festival Concert, Saturday, July 19, Luther Memorial Church. Luther Memorial Church is located at 1021 University Ave. Music Hall is on lower Bascom Hill at 455 N. Park St. Mosse Humanities Building is at 455 N. Park St. or at the corner of Park Street and University Avenue. The free MEMF Participant Concert begins at 1 p.m. Other concerts start at 7:30 p.m., with pre-concert lectures at 6:30 p.m. Concert tickets are sold at the door or in advance (508-265-2787): $20 for individual concerts or $75 for a pass for all...

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The Boy Scout motto and a tour of Italy

by Merikay Payne who recently traveled with an Educational Travel Seminar to Italy personally led by travel program director Doug Whittle of Continuing Studies. ******* Those incorrigible Boy Scouts and their “Be Prepared” motto. Founder Robert Baden-Powell probably chose the phrase after visiting Italy, sometime after it became a country in 1861. Organizing the Boy Scouts of America in 1910 just made it possible for Baden-Powell to perpetuate the value of being prepared in mind and body.   Our two-week stay in Italy took us on a route from centrally located Rome, to the lemon-growing area of Sorrento, past the cliffs of Amalfi, on to the arts and leather center of Florence, and a return to Rome by way of the Tuscany and Umbria regions.   Our travels allowed us the good fortune to: • Cruise the Amalfi coast on the way Paestum. Be prepared for cliffs meeting the sea and exploration of an ancient Greek city. • Immerse ourselves in the history of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Be prepared to witness the destruction of Mt. Vesuvius on rich and poor, but not their structures. • View Michelangelo’s David. Be prepared to see three David’s, even though there is only one Michelangelo. • Take note of the Medici family intrigue. Be prepared to connect Medici, Michelangelo, and popes in unexpected ways. • Witness first-hand that Rome really wasn’t built in a day....

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Adult students should apply for summer grants by May 1

Do you know any adults interested in returning to campus this summer as an undergraduate, graduate or Special Student at UW-Madison? Adults may be eligible for receiving financial assistance to get started with one class for this summer. The summer deadline is May 1. Deadlines for the two semesters vary. UW-Madison Continuing Studies offers Continuing Education grants that provide in-state tuition for one three-credit course three times a year: fall and spring semesters and for Summer Term. Deadlines for the two semester grants differ. For this round of grants, applicants must have a significant break (usually five years or more) in their educations–a requirement for all the grants–and plan to enroll in one course during Summer Term. Continuing Studies awards from four to 20 grants during each semester and Summer Term. . Details about criteria and applying can be found at continuingstudies.wisc.edu/advising/ce-grant.htm. For more information, call grant coordinator Jane Schimmel of Adult Career and Special Student Services at 608-263-6960 or email her at Jane...

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