The Clinical Psychology Summer Institute will provide a rare opportunity for clinical psychologists: learning about cutting-edge research in mental health from prominent psychology professors at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Michael Koenigs will show how brain imaging can help with anxiety disorders.

Michael Koenigs will show how brain imaging can help with anxiety disorders.

The institute will also provide a rare opportunity for the professors: discussing the practical applications of their research.

“The Clinical Psychology Summer Institute represents a unique approach to continuing education, because clinicians don’t usually get to hear about the latest findings from researchers at the highest level,” says Kristi Obmascher, director of Behavioral Health at UW-Madison’s Division of Continuing Studies. “Normally it’s a longer process from research to medical journals to practice. Here, practitioners can learn about findings that will change the field and improve outcomes for their clients.”

Richie Davidson will discuss brain imaging and MRI studies that examine the structural basis of well-being.

Richie Davidson will discuss brain imaging and MRI studies that examine the structural basis of well-being.

The five-day Clinical Psychology Summer Institute represents a new collaboration between UW-Madison’s Department of Psychology and Division of Continuing Studies. Held at the UW Pyle Center, it will delve into several topics related to mental health, including “Major Mental Illnesses and the DSM-5” (June 20), “Psychiatry Basics: What You Need to Know” (June 21), “Implications of Current Research on the Practice of Psychology” (June 22), “Mental Health Practice: Ethics, the Law, and Being an Expert Witness” (June 23), and “Better Than Okay: Moving Our Clients from Illness to Happiness” (June 24). Participants can sign up for individual days or for the entire week.

From research to practice

The June 22 session is the one that will explore research by UW-Madison psychology professors. In “Cultivating Well-Being: Perspectives from Affective and Contemplative Neuroscience,Richie Davidson will discuss brain imaging and MRI studies that examine the structural basis of well-being. In “Revising Neurocircuitry Models of Mood and Anxiety Disorders,” Michael Koenigs will show how brain imaging can help those with anxiety disorders.

James Li will present new evidence regarding the nature vs. nurture debate.

James Li will present new evidence regarding the nature vs. nurture debate.

In “Stress Neuroadaptation in Addiction: Basic and Applied Insights from Laboratory Drug Administration and Deprivation Studies,” John Curtin will explore the connection between stress and addiction. And in “Genetic and Environmental Influences Contributing to Youth Antisocial Behaviors,” James Li will present new evidence regarding the nature vs. nurture debate.

“UW–Madison psychopathology researchers see this institute as part of the Wisconsin Idea, where we try to contribute directly to our community,” says Hill Goldsmith, chair of the Department of Psychology. “On June 22, attendees will be able to cut through multiple layers of translation that usually separate the clinical researcher from the clinical practitioner. Our researchers are anticipating the opportunity to influence practice and to be influenced themselves by priorities of the attendees.”

Along with the speakers from the Department of Psychology, the Clinical Psychology Summer Institute features David Mays, a forensic psychiatrist who serves on the clinical faculty at UW–Madison; and Angela Janis, the director of psychiatry at UW-Madison’s University Health Services.

For more information, see here; or contact Kristi Obmascher, kristi.obmascher@wisc.edu, 608-262-8971.